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Shirini keshmeshi cookie from Iran

Posted by on 20 March, 2015
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shirini kishmish resultaat 2

Shirini keshmeshi cookie from Iran

 

On the first day of spring Iranians celebrate Nowruz, Persian New Year. The feast is to herald the return of the sun and clear light. Nowruz is the most important feast in Iran and celebrations go on for two weeks. People give each other presents, houses are scrubbed from top to bottom and richly decorated with bunting and flowers. A few days before Nowruz the ‘haft seen’ table is set with seven traditional symbolic foods that all begin with the Persian letter ‘S.’ Sumac (dried sour berries) symbolizes the rising sun, Senjed (Chinese dates) love, Serkeh (vinegar) patience and long life, Samanu (wheat pudding) fertility and affluence, Sabzeh (wheat grass sprouts) new life, Sir (garlic) healing, Seeb (apples) health and beauty. These foods will only be eaten after Nowruz. In the meantime plenty of other treats are made and eaten. There is no such thing as an Middle Eastern feast without an abundance of food and sweets! These shrini keshmeshi cookies are often baked and served during Nowruz. They used to be luxury party cookies with expensive ingredients like saffron, vanilla and eggs, but are now considered more everyday treats. These rich cookies with their distinct saffron taste are a little cake-like in the middle, but the edges are nice and crunchy. A very tasty beginning to spring!

 

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Shirini Keshmeshi cookie from Iran

shirini keshmesh ingredienten

ingredients

For about 15 cookies

about 10 saffron threads
100 grams (1 stick) butter
seeds of 1 vanilla pod
125 grams (¾cup) sugar
2 eggs
100 grams (¾ cup) raisins
150 grams (1½ cups) flour
pinch of salt

 

 

 

 

 

shirini keshmeshi saffraan weken

soak saffron

 

Leave the saffron to soak in 1 tsp of warm water.

 

 

 

 

 

shirini keshmesh boter, suiker, vanille

butter, sugar and vanilla

 

Melt the butter, leave to cool slightly and with an electric mixer beat with the vanilla and the sugar for about 5 mins.

 

 

 

 

 

iran shirini keshmesh ei erdoor

beat in the eggs

 

One by one beat in the eggs.

 

 

 

 

 

shirini keshmesh saffraan erbij

add saffron

 

 

Add the saffron and the water and keep beating until the mixture becomes light and creamy.
Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F.

 

 

 

 

iran shirini keshmesh rozijn + bloem

raisins, flour and salt

 

 

 

Add the raisins, the flour and the salt .

 

 

 

iran shirini keshmeshi meng

mix well

 

 

 

Mix well.

 

 

 

iran shirini keshmeshi

teaspoons of dough

 

 

 

 

 

Bake the shrini keshmeshi cookies in the middle of the oven for 10-15 mins. or until light brown along the edges.

Take out of the oven and leave to cool on the cookie sheet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 Responses to Shirini keshmeshi cookie from Iran

  1. rosie

    Thank you for your recipe and your description of the Haft Seen we set for Nowruz. I appreciate all the research and explanation of the elements. However, I’d like to offer that your reference to Persian New Year being an Arabic celebration is incorrect and, in fact insulting. Persians and Arabs are different in every way possible. They may live in the “middle east”, but their cultures, languages, food and celebrations are not the same. Additionally, these cookies are very common and not reserved for New Year. These cookies are everyday cookies. With our friends and family would never be served for Nowruz, because they are too common. We would serve baklava, bamieh, zaloobia, roulette and new years cookies made with chick pea flour. Thank you again for your recipe and Happy New Year (Aide Shoma Mubarak!).

    • dbrewer

      Hi Rosie, thank you for your message! I have changed the text in my description. Are you from Iran?

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